Tag Archives: curing feta

Try Your Hand At The Easiest Hard Cheese And Culturing With Our New DIY Kit

If you’ve made ricotta, paneer, mozzarella and other simple cheeses using citric acid, you’re ready to step it up with culturing and your first “hard cheese”– Feta! The Mediterranean delicacies in our Feta, Greek Yogurt and Yogurt Cream Cheese (also known as Labneh) DIY Kit make my mouth water.

Yogurt Cream Cheese

Yogurt Cream Cheese

The characteristic mouth-watering tart and complex flavors come from culturing (aka fermenting). The bacteria added to the milk eat lactose (sugar) and create lactic acid (tart!) in the right temperature. This takes time which is why these goodies are not made in an hour. But BOY…are they worth the wait!

Delicious Greek Yogurt

Delicious Greek Yogurt

The really neat thing about cultures is that you can farm them! Make the starter yogurt using the culture packets, then use the yogurt to culture your Feta and future batches of yogurt (and consequently your Greek yogurt and Labneh).  Cool huh? You can now enjoy your own homemade probiotic yogurt and custom flavored Greek yogurt. The Yogurt Cream Cheese can be left really mild like a cream cheese for bagels, or you can make it like they do in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries, salty, thick and very tangy- delicious!

Salty, crumbly Feta- Yum.

Salty, crumbly Feta- Yum.

If you feel intimidated, do not fret, culturing is what milk wants to do naturally and though Feta is considered a hard cheese, it only requires one week with our recipe and will introduce you to salt curing and aged cheeses. There is so much to learn in this kit and lots of flavor comes with that education- what a deal.

I’m very proud of this new kit- I hope you learn a lot with it!
Feta and Greek Yogurt Kit

 

Forgot to tell you a have a fresh batch of Feta curing!

Lovely giant jar of February Feta

Lovely giant jar of February Feta


Unless I make some sort of fancy cheese schedule, I will just let you know about the cheeses I’m making and their different stages/developments like this. So, I made a huge batch of raw cow milk Feta in early Feb. (if you’re in Portland, I get it at Kookoolan Farms) It’s supposed to age 2-3 months in brine. So far so good. I do fear daily that I will open the fridge to find a jar of green sludge but luckily, it still just looks like feta in brine (water that has been saturated with salt). If all goes as planned, I’ll let you know more about it when I taste it in April and May. Here are some pics of the giant jar…it is so gratifying to see it in the fridge every day!
Creepy science project view of Feta

Creepy science project view of Feta