Tag Archives: making cheese at home

New Burrata & Mascarpone DIY Cheese Kit and My Over Posting

I just realized and am mortified to find that I may have been emailing you with every silly change I make to the site! Yikes! I am SO sorry! I now know what box to check to prevent that- silly website default. My apologies. I hope I didn’t drive you to unsubscribe immediately. Specially because you would miss out on this exciting new kit…

I developed a unique recipe for Burrata for my upcoming cheesemaking book (May 2014!)- if you don’t know this cheese, imagine a pouch of fresh mozzarella filled with cream and soft curds! You get to try this version early with your own Burrata & Mascarpone DIY Cheese Kit. Mascarpone is amazing for desserts (Tiramisu!) but also perfect for creamy sauces. Both cheeses are very traditionally Italian and favorites for foodies! Hope you enjoy! As usual, contact us via the contact page if you have any questions at all- it’s just as good as a direct email. Colleen and I are standing by. Claudia

Burrata and Mascarpone Kit

DIY Cheese Kits on Daily Grommet- inventions, innovative products, good gifts…

Update- the VIDEO reviewing my kits is out. Watch me be nervous and blink way too much! This is what happens when you make things after work, late at night! Ha. They did a good job and even made cheese though!

I’m excited to share some great news: Friday 4/15, beginning at noon (EST), 9am for us west coast folks, and running throughout the weekend, Daily Grommet (http://www.dailygrommet.com) will feature our DIY Cheese Kits!  Daily Grommet is a new company with a mission to find unique products and share their stories through video, blog, and an active community discussion.

I hope you’ll take a moment to stop by DailyGrommet.com when our kits are being featured.  It would be wonderful to hear your thoughts, reflections, and feedback and to add them to the conversation – it’s really easy to leave a comment in the “Talk about this Grommet” section.  And if you want to make sure you don’t miss our feature, just sign up for the daily email from Daily Grommet.

After our time on the Daily Grommet homepage, you can still find our DIY Cheese Kits under “Recent Grommets” or within the shopping categories.  Feel free to comment there – Daily Grommet customers often search through this area of past Grommets looking for great gift ideas and special treats for themselves!

Thanks so much for your support and we hope to see you at Daily Grommet! (I’ll be there commenting as well.) Claudia

Whole Milk Ricotta

Ricotta is an example of a simple farmers cheese born out of necessity and invention.

Traditionally made from whey, a cheesemaking by-product, this cheese made sure nothing went to waste at the farm. If you don’t make hard cheeses you can make a delicious creamy ricotta from whole milk in one hour!

ricotta

Ingredients:

1 gallon of milk

1 tsp citric acid OR 1/4 cup vinegar of choice (to purchase citric acid or a complete ricotta kit visit our SHOP.)

1 tsp Cheese salt (To Taste)

Supplies:

Large pot- at least 6 quart

Butter Muslin (fine cheesecloth)

Thermometer

Colander

Large Slotted spoon

YIELD- 1 ½ to 2lbs. (lots!)

Here we go- fresh Ricotta is within our reach!

Step 1- Measure the citric acid into ½ cup of water and stir.

Step 2- Pour your milk into the pot, pour the citric acid solution and salt (optional) into the milk and mix thoroughly.

Step 3- Heat the milk to 180°F to 185°F (do not allow to boil over). Stir often to prevent scorching.

Step 4- As soon as the curds and whey separate (make sure there is no milky whey), turn off the heat. Allow to set undisturbed for 10 minutes.

Step 5- Line a colander with butter muslin (fine cheesecloth).

Curds, no Whey

Curds draining

Drain in the colander for 15-30 minutes, or until the cheese has reached the desired consistency (you can gently expedite by lifting the muslin by the corners and rocking the curds around to unblocked cloth areas. The cheese is ready to eat in sweet or savory dishes immediately!

Step 6- Store any leftovers in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Simple Mozzarella

Who doesn’t love soft, fresh cheese with sun kissed tomatoes and bright basil? Throw in some fresh bread and a little olive oil…now imagine that with your own warm, homemade mozzarella! You can make it and have it ready in an hour. Check it out!

mozzarella knot

herbed warm mozzarella tied into a simple knot

Ingredients:

1 gallon of milk

1 ½ tsp citric acid (to purchase citric acid or a complete mozzarella kit visit our SHOP.)

¼ Rennet Tablet

1 tsp cheese salt (or to taste, herbs optional)


Supplies:

Large pot- at least 6 quart

Butter Muslin (fine cheesecloth)

Colander

Large Slotted spoon

Thermometer

microwaveable bowl

Rubber gloves or large spoon


YIELD- 1 ½ lb (2 big fists)


Ok, less than an hour to fresh Mozzarella!

If you’d like to see this process in step by step photos, check out my Facebook Album. The only part you don’t see is the heating of the curds before folding and kneading, you will choose microwave or hot water bath but the curd handling is the same.

Step 1- Dissolve ¼ rennet tablet into 1 cup of cool, chlorine-free water. Stir and set aside. Wrap the remaining pieces of tablet and store in the freezer.

Step 2- Mix 1 ½ teaspoons citric acid into 1 cup of cool, chlorine-free water until dissolved.

Step 3- Pour 1 gallon of milk into your pot. Pour the citric acid solution in and stir thoroughly. Heat to 90°F, stirring occasionally to prevent scorching.

Step 4- At 90°F slowly stir in the rennet solution with a gentle up and down motion for approximately 30 seconds. Continue to heat to 105°F (110°F if you will use the water bath).

Step 5- Your curds could already show clear signs of coagulation- curds would look like shiny yogurt, you’d see a separation between curds and whey and the curds would pull from the sides of the pot.

– If so, stir very gently for another minute and turn off the heat. Skip down to step 6.

– If the curd doesn’t look like shiny custard or yogurt but looks like clumps of melted cheese floating in yellow liquid, you’re still in good shape. Skip down to step 6.

– If you don’t see any of these signs and your whey is still milky instead of yellow, heat a little more (110°F max) while gently moving the curds around with your spoon. You are now cooking the curds and expelling whey. If you reach 110°F and still don’t see any signs, let the pot sit off the heat for 15-45 minutes. Skip down to step 6 when you have coagulation.

– If your milk did not form a curd at all, you may have some unlabeled ultra-pasteurized milk on your hands. Try another brand but follow this through- cheese has a way of working out!

Step 6- Ladle your curds into a heat-resistant bowl. At this point, you can cover and refrigerate the curds for stretching later or move on to the heating and stretching steps.

Note- If you will use the “Water Bath” (no microwave) method, heat your whey to 185°F and read the following instructions in bold. For microwave instructions, continue below the bold print.

______________________________________________________________________________

No Microwave? No problem! Follow these instructions:

When your water/whey bath hits 185°F (no hotter or you’ll overcook your curds!) take the pot off the stove.

Gently shape half of your curds into a ball (as much as possible) and dip into the whey for 1-3 minutes or until your curds hit 135°F (heated to the core). Put on your rubber gloves, lift the ball of curds out of the whey and proceed with salting, stretching and shaping as detailed below in steps 11 and 12 (you may also stretch with a spoon in your heat-resistant bowl).

Repeat on all curds- more than once if necessary for a smooth ball of cheese. You may need to reheat your whey if you’re slow- remember, no hotter than 185°F! If temperamental curds don’t stretch sometimes, do not despair. Just fold, salt, and shape warm curds into balls. Practice, practice- enjoy!

___________________________________________________________________________________

Step 7- Ladle your curds into a large microwaveable bowl. Put on your rubber gloves or use a large spoon for steps 7-12. Gently hold back the curds while you pour off whey (don’t press much).

Step 8- Heat the bowl in the microwave for 1 minute.

Step 9- Gently use a spoon to fold the curds over several times and evenly distribute the heat. Drain off any whey as above.

Step 10- Microwave for another 30 seconds. Drain again and knead the curd gently- try stretching. It must be 135°F to stretch properly. If it isn’t hot enough, microwave for another 30 seconds.

Step 11- Add your salt (I like 1.5 tsp or so) plus any herbs and work into the cheese by stretching and folding, stretching and folding…the more you work the curd, the firmer the cheese will be.

Step 12- Stretch the cheese until it is smooth. Shape into a ball or get creative! This mozzarella is best eaten immediately but you can store it covered. Do NOT store in water or whey or it will get slimy and disintegrate. You can however, dunk your shaped mozz into ice water for just a few minutes to retain it’s shape. Otherwise, its own heat can flatten it. Use within 1 week.

Simple Creamy Goat Cheese

Goat cheese, or as the French say it, Chèvre (shev) is a deliciously tangy addition to almost any dish and is perfect eaten simply with crusty bread or fruit.

You can now whip it up in less than an hour (plus some optional wait time) and customize it with herbs and spices for endless variations. This tangy cheese makes a wonderful treat to take to a dinner party but be careful, you’ll start getting requests!

 

Stack of chevre wheels

It's easy to customize your chevre!

 

Simple Creamy Goat Cheese 

Ingredients:

half gallon of goat milk (2 quarts)

1 tsp citric acid (to purchase citric acid or a complete goat cheese kit visit our SHOP.)

1 tsp Cheese salt (to taste)

1 tsp Herbs de Provence (optional)

Supplies:

Large pot- at least 4 quart

Butter Muslin (fine cheesecloth)

Colander

Large Slotted spoon

Cheese Molds


YIELD- About ¾ lb


Step 1- Measure the citric acid into ½ cup of water and stir.

Step 2- Pour your milk into the pot, pour the citric acid solution and salt into the milk and mix thoroughly.

 

Curds and Whey

Curds and Whey

 

Step 3- Heat the milk to 180°F-185°F (do not allow to boil). Stir often to prevent scorching. You will see coagulation (white and yellowish separations), turn off the heat.

Step 4- Allow to set undisturbed and off the heat for 10-15 minutes. Line a colander with your fine cheesecloth and gently pour or scoop your curds into the colander to drain out the whey. Once most of the whey has drained out, sprinkle in your salt and blend in gently.

 

Curds, no Whey

Curds, no Whey

 

Step 5- Mix in your herbs (or you can coat the shaped wheels later instead) and stir minimally.

Step 6- Spoon your curds into the cheese molds. Press just enough to evenly fill the molds. Place the molds on a flat pan so any extra whey can drain. Drain 10-30 minutes or to your desired consistency. If you have more cheese, drain in it the cloth for a “bag cheese.“

 

Chevre Draining in Molds

Chevre Draining in Molds

 

Step 7- Gently but firmly unmold (hold upside down and tap out) your cheeses and enjoy! If the cheese sticks, you can cut small pieces of your cloth and line the molds next time. If you don’t have molds, you can alternately just shape the cheese into a log with the help of wax paper. Cover and store in the refrigerator up to a week.

Paneer

Paneer, a mild, no-fail cheese is great for beginners and fun to make with kids but it’s so delicious and versatile that advanced cheese makers and cooks around the world love it.

 

One gallon makes a lot of Paneer!

 

It is unique because though it softens, it doesn’t really melt. Paneer actually absorbs seasonings and sauces that surround it. This makes it a perfect tasty additions to curries, pasta dishes, saucy enchiladas, kabobs and any recipe that calls for tofu or chicken. With this simple recipe you can make it in less than an hour!

Paneer

Ingredients:

1 gallon milk

2 tsp citric acid or 8 tbsp lemon juice- no acid or water
(to purchase citric acid or a complete Paneer and Queso Blanco Kit visit our SHOP.)

2 tsp Cheese salt (to taste)


Supplies:

Large pot- at least 6 quart

Butter Muslin (fine cheesecloth)

Colander

Large Slotted spoon


YIELD- 1 ¾ to 2lbs.


Step 1- Measure the citric acid into 1 cup of cool water and stir. Let it sit and dissolve.

Step 2- Heat the milk in your pot stirring often to prevent scorching at the bottom. Heat until you see foam and steam (190˚F). Do not allow to boil.

Step 3- Turn the heat to low, before the foam subsides, drizzle in the citric acid solution in and watch the magic! Cook for 1 minute, stirring gently.

Step 4- Remove from the heat and continue to stir gently. The curds are white and the whey should be yellowish green. If the whey is whitish, sprinkle a pinch more citric acid in the pot.

Step 5- Once you get a clear separation of curds and whey, let the pot sit undisturbed for 10 minutes.

Step 6- Pour the curds into a colander lined with cheesecloth. Gently twist the top of the cloth to squeeze out extra whey. This is the time to add salt or optional herbs for savory dishes.

 

salting curds

salting the curds

 

Step 7- Rest the bundle in the colander, cover the curds with the cloths corners and place a plate and a weight (such as a gallon of water) on top and press for ½ hour-1 hour.

Step 8- Unwrap the cheese and refrigerate in a covered container for maximum firmness. You can cut it, cook with it, eat it as is and store it in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Try browning a small piece in a little olive oil, salt and pepper…yum!

Oh! You can also make sweet cheese desserts using Paneer (check out the Ras Malai videos on our home page ‘World Cheese Tour’ or go to YouTube and search for Ras Malai)

Two free Queso Blanco demonstrations coming your way!

Hello. I love the Montavilla Farmers Market! It’s in my neighborhood, I used to shop there and now I have little stall there most Sundays. Even though I can be a little shy (read- antisocial) normally, I have been enjoying talking to would-be and experienced cheesemakers tremendously. At this point people who bought a kit last week come and report on their experience- it’s so fun, such a community feel! This small but perfectly complete market is a treat- I hope you can check it out sometime (it will extend into Oct and Nov)!

A good day to come by is Sun. Oct. 4th when I will be demonstrating Queso Blanco with the market’s resident chef Kathryn.

Queso Blanco Shaped in a Ricotta Mold

Queso Blanco Shaped in a Ricotta Mold

We will make the cheese from start to finish and use market goodies to create a savory and sweet way to sample this versatile cheese (she will be working on a mostarda? or chutney of some sort!). It’s at 10:30am and free. I know you will LOVE this market too!

Then as a reminder, I will lead this very same demo at The Wedge Cheese Festival on Saturday Oct. 3 at 11am. I will be browning some queso in olive oil this day- you’ll be hooked…

Free class, free samples! How often does that happen?

You’re not dreaming, it’s a cheese FESTIVAL!

The Wedge Cheese Festival is taking place in Portland, OR on October 3, 2009! How amazing is that?

Build your own grilled cheese sandwich!

Build your own grilled cheese sandwich!

Dozens of cheesemakers from the Pacific Northwest will
gather (with samples no doubt!), seminars will be offered, there will be
a build your own grilled cheese sandwich station and yours truly will
lead a Queso Blanco demo at 11am. Don’t miss it!

Mozzarella Demonstration- Free at Foster and Dobbs!

Hi all, please join me at the cheesemaker’s group on Wed. September 9 at 7:30pm at Foster and Dobbs here in Portland, OR where I will give a simple mozzarella demo. All are welcome, there is no charge, it’s just an informal skill-share.

Yes, you too can make this!

Yes, you too can make this!

I’m excited to announce that Foster and Dobbs Authentic Foods now carries Urban Cheesecraft DIY Goat Cheese Kits and Paneer and Queso Blanco Kits.

They are an A M A Z I N G specialty foods and cheese shop, think organic chocolate, delicious olives, smoked salts and even, yes, saffron pollen, all from small, artisanal producers. Can you imagine a Foster and Dobbs picnic? Um, I can!

So easy, so beautiful…so franch! Chevre is pretty no?

I just had to share these lovely goat cheese photos with you. These 3 little cheeses are the yield you get with the recipes I include in the goat cheese kit. A half-gallon of goat milk, a 1/4 C of vinegar, a variety of herbs and spices and you have a cheese tasting for several friends!