Tag Archives: paneer

Fall feast day is almost here!

This morning I found the garden, grass, fence, and my car covered in glittery ice. It makes me hopeful for snow!! Wouldn’t that be neat tomorrow when lots of people are off work and school? Whatever happens and how you spend it, I hope you have good company and a full belly.

As I dream about what I’ll be making for our feast, I thought I’d post my best wishes for you along with my menu ideas! I did get a turkey from our good friends at Terra Farma (same farm where we get our milk, eggs, chicken, pork) and lots of winter squash from our CSA farmers at Fiddlehead Farm.

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I like seasonal treats. Where I veer off is what I make with them. I am not a traditionalist when it comes to food. There are too many yummy dishes to try. The following links are to my inspiration recipes. I plan to tweak the recipes a bit as I tend to do.

I can’t help but bring in my Mexican roots so this year I think I’ll treat friends to turkey mole (not pronounced like hole or the bullfighting cheer- ole! Start saying molecular and stop after mole….then put the accent on the mo, not the le- confusing enough? Hey I’m not a language instructor). Mole is what many Mexican American households make with leftover turkey (or an easy turkey machaca) but since I always preferred it over turkey and gravy, why not start there? We’ll also have potato, paneer and delicata squash mole for the vegetarians. I was going to take the day off making cheese but the paneer sounds too good in the mole! We’ll keep it casual and make tacos with delicious Three Sisters masa and tortillas and if I can pull it off, some kind of pumpkin spice flan (or ice cream!). We’ll wash it all down with a chilled autumn fruit sangria.

Paneer

The paneer in a spicy stew (paneer doesn’t melt) is inspired by Indian curries of course- if you have my book, you know I like mixing cuisine styles. Sounds like a delicious menu to me- it’ll be fun to share. Hope you have a relaxing day (don’t stress out over perfection) and if you end up shopping during your food coma (does not get more American than that I’m afraid), here are some links to our new hexagon shaped Williams Sonoma kits, and our deluxe kit and book bundle featured on Portland Eater’s holiday gift guide for food lovers. Oh, if you like my ramblings (and photos of cheese), follow me on Instagram where I post almost daily! Cheers, Claudia

mozz hex ws

Two free Queso Blanco demonstrations coming your way!

Hello. I love the Montavilla Farmers Market! It’s in my neighborhood, I used to shop there and now I have little stall there most Sundays. Even though I can be a little shy (read- antisocial) normally, I have been enjoying talking to would-be and experienced cheesemakers tremendously. At this point people who bought a kit last week come and report on their experience- it’s so fun, such a community feel! This small but perfectly complete market is a treat- I hope you can check it out sometime (it will extend into Oct and Nov)!

A good day to come by is Sun. Oct. 4th when I will be demonstrating Queso Blanco with the market’s resident chef Kathryn.

Queso Blanco Shaped in a Ricotta Mold

Queso Blanco Shaped in a Ricotta Mold

We will make the cheese from start to finish and use market goodies to create a savory and sweet way to sample this versatile cheese (she will be working on a mostarda? or chutney of some sort!). It’s at 10:30am and free. I know you will LOVE this market too!

Then as a reminder, I will lead this very same demo at The Wedge Cheese Festival on Saturday Oct. 3 at 11am. I will be browning some queso in olive oil this day- you’ll be hooked…

Free class, free samples! How often does that happen?

You’re not dreaming, it’s a cheese FESTIVAL!

The Wedge Cheese Festival is taking place in Portland, OR on October 3, 2009! How amazing is that?

Build your own grilled cheese sandwich!

Build your own grilled cheese sandwich!

Dozens of cheesemakers from the Pacific Northwest will
gather (with samples no doubt!), seminars will be offered, there will be
a build your own grilled cheese sandwich station and yours truly will
lead a Queso Blanco demo at 11am. Don’t miss it!

Mozzarella Demonstration- Free at Foster and Dobbs!

Hi all, please join me at the cheesemaker’s group on Wed. September 9 at 7:30pm at Foster and Dobbs here in Portland, OR where I will give a simple mozzarella demo. All are welcome, there is no charge, it’s just an informal skill-share.

Yes, you too can make this!

Yes, you too can make this!

I’m excited to announce that Foster and Dobbs Authentic Foods now carries Urban Cheesecraft DIY Goat Cheese Kits and Paneer and Queso Blanco Kits.

They are an A M A Z I N G specialty foods and cheese shop, think organic chocolate, delicious olives, smoked salts and even, yes, saffron pollen, all from small, artisanal producers. Can you imagine a Foster and Dobbs picnic? Um, I can!

So easy, so beautiful…so franch! Chevre is pretty no?

I just had to share these lovely goat cheese photos with you. These 3 little cheeses are the yield you get with the recipes I include in the goat cheese kit. A half-gallon of goat milk, a 1/4 C of vinegar, a variety of herbs and spices and you have a cheese tasting for several friends!

Throw another chunk of cheese on the barby! Huh?

So I went to my first BBQ of the season and as I do for most get-togethers, I decided to make cheese. You may already know that I often pan-fry Paneer and Queso Blanco (because they don’t melt!) but I don’t often grill them…of course I had to try. Though my cheese wasn’t very tasty today (I tried to multi task and allowed the milk to boil, a lot, I know better but it snuck up on me..email is distracting, time warp!), it was quite firm which made it great for the grill.

I had a michelada (mexican beer with lime juice and chili/salt mix) or two at the BBQ so I didn’t take photos of the results for you but I did take pictures of the prep and build up. Imagine toasty cheese cubes with grilled red peppers and potatoes, drizzled with rosemary, garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper…yum! Don’t leave this on the grill too long or your cheese will get very dry- I did that.

Apartment Sauerkraut

APARTMENT SAUERKRAUT (I know, it’s not cheese but it’s preservation by fermentation- very related 🙂

I came up with this because all sauerkraut recipes I found as I researched called for at least 5 heads of cabbage and a 5 gallon bucket…with all the projects and a business that I run at once, I don’t have space! Nor do I want that much sauerkraut for two people.

As usual, the stuff I enjoy making is easy and foolproof. So, keep in mind that sauerkraut is one of the easiest of farm skills. The Pennsylvania dutch left it for the children to make, you CAN make it!

apt. kraut set up

apt. kraut set up

Here’s my apt. kraut recipe:

1 small head of cabbage (green, red or mixed for fun color!)

2 tablespoons of salt (I used kosher flakes)

1 teaspoon celery seed, freshly ground black pepper and I LOVED red pepper flakes (you can try any dry herbs)

1 cylindrical gallon container (can be glass, ceramic or food grade plastic), I used the plastic cream cheese container you see in the picture, similar to a yogurt container but bigger

A small plate or what I used, a quart sized yogurt lid (this should fit snugly inside so that the cabbage on the edge doesn’t rot)

A weight or what I used, another cream cheese container filled with water (it has to fit inside the other- lid on)

Cheesecloth or hanky to keep out dust and bugs

Rubber band

Okay, shred your cabbage or cut finely. Mix it with the herbs and salt by tossing it all in a large bowl. Now scoop in by the handful and push down between scoops.  At the end you want to really tamp it down with your fist or a tool like a potato smasher. Now place the plate/lid inside on top of your cabbage. Follow with the weight/heavy container.

The idea is that the pressure and salt will draw out the cabbage’s liquid. The salty brine will preserve your cabbage and keep it from rotting until lacto-fermentation starts- you’re preserving! Congratulations! Along the way you are making live food (micro-organisms, much like live yogurt cultures) that is good for you! Check out Wild Fermentations by Sandor Katz if you want to learn more about this.

Wait, you’re not done yet! Cover your contraption with the cloth, then rubber band it. Push down on the weight every two hours that day, you should get a brine within a couple of hours. The cabbage must be covered in it to prevent rotting. If you have some dry old cabbage on your hands, just make a salty solution and cover the cabbage to help it along.

Keep pushing down morning, noon and night (I do it when I wake up, after I get home and before I go to bed) for two more days. Once you know that you have a nice and juicy concoction, leave it for at least 2 weeks.  You can start testing for taste (look for a tang) and skimming any pink “scum” or even mold off the top. It should be just fine below that layer (all the recipes warn about this but I have never had it happen). Trust your senses, does it smell bad, off, rotten? A slightly gassy cabbage smell and/or pickle smell is ok.

this is the early stage that I liked best, like tangy coleslaw! see those pepper flakes? yum!

this is the early stage that I liked best, like tangy coleslaw! see those pepper flakes? yum!

As far as how long you wait, I like the early crunchy stages, others think true krauts are translucent and very soft. It’s all about your taste. Sauerkraut was created so that cabbage could last almost an entire year so you have some wiggle room! I jarred (just a jar with a lid, no canning skills needed) and refrigerated at several stages just to try. You can do this too, and it’s nice to keep some of the previous batch to mix in as a starter with the next batch- it gets a head start!

jar of delicious kraut

jar of delicious kraut

This recipe made three 16-20 ounce sized jars, plenty for us! Oh, your place can smell a little “gassy” while you make this. It’s cabbage, what do you expect?! I either get used to it or it lessens as the ferment ages. ps. I’ve tasted friends’ delicious krauts that included garlic, daikon radish, ginger, and even juniper berries, have fun experimenting!

Find cheese kits and cheese making supplies in Portland stores now!

Good news! If you’re in Portland, you can purchase a kit at these Portland, Oregon stores. I will keep adding as the list grows. If you own a store or want to suggest one, I’d love to hear about it. Enjoy and always come back for updates on the kits etc. thanks!

 is a cute kit like this in your future?

is a cute kit like this in your future?

Stores:

http://www.albertagrocery.coop/ (all 3 kits- moz/ricotta, paneer/queso blanco, fresh goat cheese)

http://www.urbanfarmstore.com/ (moz/ricotta kit by June 5)

cheese talk on the radio!

Hello cheesemakers! Just wanted to let you know something kind of funny, I’m going to be interviewed about cheese making and my cheese kits on a small Internet radio station this Thursday, May 21. It’ll be a show called Chocolate Covered Bacon through http://artisanshoppe.com/, 3pm Pacific Time, 6pm Eastern Time.

Click install or listen live depending on your set-up and you should be good. It won’t be riveting or anything but it’s kinda cool especially if any of you want to promote your handmade goods too. They’re all about artisans of all kinds. Tell them I sent you!

Also, I’d love to hear from those of you who have already received and tried your cheese kits. Please post on this blog or email me with questions, ideas, feedback, testimonials etc. Thanks and happy cheese making,

making mozzarella cheese with kids- it works!!

I recently gave a cheese kit to some friends in Austin. I was staying with them and since they’re entrepreneurial foodie types I thought they’d enjoy one. They did, but they soon asked for a demo and offered me the assistance of their three kids!! Gulp. Ranging from 9-2 years old…a challenge to say the least.

I was concerned that one, it would be too passive of an activity…step one, let’s watch milk heat up slowly…my other concern was that when we got to the stretching part they’d burn themselves.

Well, I’m happy to say that they remained pretty much interested (though the two year-old “multi-tasked” in other rooms halfway through) and we did indeed end up with mozzarella that they all took to school the next day :). As a bonus, no one burned themselves though we did sacrifice a good stretch for that bonus! Here we are hard at work, note my concerned look!

ps. Ideally I’d start kids with queso blanco- although it is not as hands-on, it’s faster, fool proof and does not involved dunking your hands into super hot water or stretching curds! check out my recipes section